New study using cryo-electron microscopy shows how potential drugs could inhibit cancer

(Source – National Institutes of Health)

A new study shows that it is possible to use an imaging technique called cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to view, in atomic detail, the binding of a potential small molecule drug to a key protein in cancer cells. The cryo-EM images also helped the researchers establish, at atomic resolution, the sequence of structural changes that normally occur in the protein, p97, an enzyme critical for protein regulation that is thought to be a novel anti-cancer target.

The study appeared online January 28, 2016, in Science. Sriram Subramaniam, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Center for Cancer Research, led the research. NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

“Cryo-EM is positioned to become an even more useful tool in structural biology and cancer drug development,” said Douglas Lowy, M.D., acting director, NCI. “This latest finding provides a tantalizing possibility for advancing effective drug development.” Read more…

 

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