Are Copay Coupons Actually Making Drugs More Expensive?

(By Charles Ornstein for ProPublica)

Consumers, including a ProPublica reporter, love saving money using drug copay coupons. But by upending the benefit structure of health insurers, these clever marketing tools may be increasing costs for everyone.

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This story was co-published with the Washington Post.

A few months back, after returning from a family vacation that involved lots of pool time, my 9-year-old son complained that his ear hurt. A Sunday morning trip to urgent care brought a diagnosis of swimmer’s ear — an infection of the outer ear canal — and a prescription for ear drops.

When my wife went to fill the prescription, for a quarter of an ounce, she was told that our share of the cost would be $135. Read article here….

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